Understanding Aged Care Payment Options

Understanding Aged Care Payment Options

When the time comes to investigate residential aged care for yourself, or a loved one, the search for a facility and how to pay for it can seem daunting. The system is complex, and decisions are often made in the midst of a health crisis. This brief guide explains fee structures and payment options.

Factors such as location to family and friends, reputation for care or general appeal are just as important as the sometimes-high price of a room and other fees in residential aged care.

Even so, costs can’t be ignored.i

Accommodation charges

The first thing to be aware of when researching your residential aged care options is that there are separate costs for the accommodation and the care provided by the facility.

The accommodation payment essentially covers your right to occupy a room. You can pay this accommodation fee as a lump sum called the Refundable Accommodation Deposit (RAD), or a daily rate similar to rent, or combination of both.

The daily rate is known as the Daily Accommodation Payment or DAP, and is effectively a daily interest rate set by the government. The current daily rate is 4.04 per cent. If the RAD is $550,000 then the equivalent DAP is $60.87 a day ($550,000 x 4.04%, divided by 365 days).

A resident can pay as much or as little towards the RAD as they choose, but any outstanding amount is charged as a DAP.

The RAD is fully refundable to the estate, unless it is used to pay any of the aged care costs such as the DAP.

Daily fees

As well as an accommodation cost there are daily resident fees that cover living and care costs. There is a basic daily fee which everyone pays and is set at 85 per cent of the basic single Age Pension. The current rate is $52.71 a day and covers the essentials such as food, laundry, utilities and basic care.

Then there is a means tested care fee which is determined by Services Australia or Veteran’s Affairs. This figure can range from $0 to about $256 a day depending on a person’s income and assets. The figure has an indexed annual and a lifetime cap – currently set at $28,339 a year or $68,013 over a lifetime.

Some facilities offer extra services, where a compulsory extra services fee is paid. It has nothing to do with care but may include extras like special outings, a choice of meals, wine with meals and daily newspaper delivery. It can range from $20-$100 a day.

A means assessment determines if you need to pay the means-tested care fee and if the government will contribute to your accommodation costs. Everyone who moves into an aged care home is quoted a room price before moving in. The means assessment then determines if you will have to pay the agreed room price, or RAD, or contribute towards it.

How means testing works

A means-tested amount above a certain threshold is used to determine whether you pay the quoted RAD and how much the government will contribute towards the means-tested care fee.

A person on the full Age Pension and with property and assets below about $37,155 would have all their costs met by the government, except the $52.71 a day basic daily fee.

A person on the full Age Pension with a home and a protected person, such as their spouse, living in it and assets between $37,155 and $173,075 may be asked to contribute towards their accommodation and care.

To be classified a low means resident there would be assessable assets below $173,075.20 (indexed). It is also subject to an income test.

A low means resident may pay a Daily Accommodation Contribution (DAC) instead of a DAP which can then be converted to a Refundable Accommodation Contribution (RAC). They may also pay a small means-tested care fee.

Payment strategies

The fees you may pay for residential care and how you pay them requires careful consideration. For example, selling assets such as the former home to pay for your residential care can affect your aged care fees and Age Pension entitlements.

If you would like to discuss aged care payment options and how to ensure you find the right residential care at a cost you or your loved one can afford, give us a call.

i All costs quoted in this article are available on https://www.myagedcare.gov.au/aged-care-home-costs-and-fees

This article is intended as an information source only and to provide general information only. The comments, examples, words and extracts from legislation and other sources in this publication do not constitute legal advice, financial or tax advice and should not be relied upon as such. All readers should seek advice from a professional adviser regarding the application of any of the comments in this article to their particular situation.


Future proofing your career with professional development

Future proofing your career with professional development

“The only thing that is constant is change” – so said the ancient Greek philosopher Heraclitus and it continues to ring true today.

Industries are changing, continuing to evolve in response to challenges (such as the COVID-19 pandemic), technological disruptors and customer expectations. As a result, there is a greater need for the workforce to continue to adapt and develop. We need to be agile to stay on top of these changes, continue developing and learning, which will work towards future proofing our careers.

While some industries have formal professional development programs, there are many ways to foster your own development for those who don’t have formal pathways. Here is how you can take the lead to future proof your career.

Enrol in a course

Some workplaces offer both in-person and online courses, for example LinkedIn Learning, so take advantage of what’s on offer. You can also seek out professional courses relevant to your industry to upskill, keeping you abreast of the changing environment – not to mention that further education is a great additional to your CV as it showcases your engagement within the industry and your proactive approach to your career.

Attend webinars or seminars

While COVID restrictions have halted many in-person seminars, there are plenty of online webinars you can attend, some which are specifically on the topic of future proofing your career. While there are a number of free webinars you can attend, others may be offered by organisations to their members. Paid membership to these organisations be they industry groups, or groups centred around a common goal, can be a worthwhile investment assisting with not only educational sessions but networking opportunities.

Not only are webinars accessible from your office or living room, they tend to be more budget-friendly than seminars. However, seminars offer face-to-face learning and networking opportunities, so they are great to utilise where possible.

Pick up a book or listen to podcasts

It doesn’t get easier than picking up a book to arm yourself with new knowledge. There is a wealth of information out there, some which will be general advice discussing trends and management styles, others that will be tailored to your industry.

If you don’t have much time to read, opt for an audio book to listen to in the car or during exercise. Podcasts are also excellent ways of getting helpful information in a format that is convenient and can be tapped in and out of. As they are regularly created, you’re likely to get more up-to-date information this way.

Enlist the help of a mentor

It’s clear that a mentor can help you stay on top of your industry or explore new opportunities by providing support and guidance. A 2019 survey showed that while 76% of people thought mentors are important, only 37% actually have one.i

The study also found that 61% of mentor-mentee relationships developed naturally, with 25% happening after someone offered to mentor, and 14% when someone asked for a mentor. This means that there’s likely to already be someone in your life who could be your mentor. Think about who is dynamic in facing industry changes and don’t be shy to ask if they’re open to mentoring you.

Join peer groups

An extension of having a mentor, peer groups provide you with the support of others who are also dedicated to professional and personal growth. If you are someone who thrives on peer support, it will be invaluable to be part of a group of people rather than going it alone.

You can give each other feedback, check in on each other’s goals and share helpful experiences and resources such as great books or webinars. This is also a fantastic way to make real-life connections – you might even meet someone who helps you land a new job or open doors to a new industry. Online tools such as Meetup can help you find a group near you and keep an eye on industry meetups as well.

Life is full of change, but rather than feeling overwhelmed, embrace it. By furthering your education, you’ll future proof your career and feel more empowered tackling the changes you face.

i https://online.olivet.edu/research-statistics-on-professional-mentors

This article is intended as an information source only and to provide general information only. The comments, examples, words and extracts from legislation and other sources in this publication do not constitute legal advice, financial or tax advice and should not be relied upon as such. All readers should seek advice from a professional adviser regarding the application of any of the comments in this article to their particular situation.


Is super insurance cover worth it

Is super insurance cover worth it? Pay close attention to the terms

Is super insurance cover worth it

Is super insurance cover worth it? Pay close attention to the terms

Buying insurance through super has some advantages, but you need to make sure you are getting the right cover for your individual needs. In some cases, you may be paying for nothing.

Most super funds offer life and total and permanent disability (TPD) insurance to fund members and, in some cases, income protection cover.

But since the introduction of the Protecting your Super reforms in 2019, this cover is no longer automatic.

If you have less than $6000 in your account or it has been inactive, then the insurance component will have been cancelled unless you advised the fund otherwise. An account may be deemed inactive if, for example, it has not received a contribution for more than 16 months.

In addition, insurance cover is no longer offered to new fund members aged under 25.

Is it right for you?

If you do have insurance in your super account, then it’s a good idea to check the cover is right for you. This is particularly the case now that the stapling measure has been introduced as part of the recent Your Future, Your Super legislation.

From November 1, unless you choose a new fund when you change jobs, the first fund you joined will be ‘stapled’ to you throughout your working life. This is where problems can arise; while the fund stays the same, so will the insurance cover.

Say you move from a low-risk job where the insurance offered in your super was more than adequate to a high-risk job such as in construction or mining. Would your insurance now cover you if you were no longer able to work? And if it did, would the cover be sufficient? It may well be that your new occupation is not even covered.

Most TPD policies within super are for “any” occupation rather than “own” occupation. This three-letter definition can make a world of difference. If you still have the capacity to work in some other occupation, then it is likely your insurance will not pay out.i

Many benefits

Despite this, there are still quite a few benefits to having insurance cover in your super. Firstly, the premiums are generally lower because the fund buys the insurance cover in bulk. In addition, your premium payments are effectively lower as they come out of your pre-tax rather than your post-tax income.

What’s more, you are not having to put your hand in your pocket to pay the premiums as the money automatically comes out of your super. Of course, the flipside is you will have less money working to build your retirement savings.

So, when it comes to taking out insurance, going through your super has lots of positives.

But the downside is that the default level payout may be lower than you might need. You should check if this is the case and maybe consider making additional premium payments to give yourself and your family more appropriate cover. Be aware though that opting for a higher payout could mean you have to undergo a medical.

Also, life insurance cover in super actually reduces over time to the point where your cover reaches zero by the time you are 70. And for TPD cover it ceases at 65.ii

Regular checks

Wherever you get insurance cover, it’s important to remember that its purpose is generally to cover any outstanding debt and ongoing financial obligations should you pass away or become unable to work.

For this reason, it is important to regularly check your insurance within your super to ensure it is sufficient to maintain your lifestyle.

If it falls short, then you might also consider taking out a policy outside super.

While income protection is sometimes available through your super, it may be necessary to look outside. Such policies pay you a regular income for a specified period if you are unable to work through an illness or injury, and premiums are tax-deductible outside super.

When you are leading a busy life with lots of claims on your income, insurance may be seen as an unnecessary expense. But when it comes to the crunch, it can play a valuable role in you and your family’s life when you need it most.

Please call us to discuss your insurance needs and whether your existing cover, both inside super and outside, is sufficient.

i https://moneysmart.gov.au/how-life-insurance-works/total-and-permanent-disability-tpd-insurance

ii https://thenewdaily.com.au/finance/dollars-and-sense/2021/08/02/insurance-life-tpd-superannuation/

This article is intended as an information source only and to provide general information only. The comments, examples, words and extracts from legislation and other sources in this publication do not constitute legal advice, financial or tax advice and should not be relied upon as such. All readers should seek advice from a professional adviser regarding the application of any of the comments in this article to their particular situation.


Changes afoot: time to review your income protection cover?

Changes afoot: time to review your income protection cover?

Major changes to income protection and salary continuance insurance schemes are set to take place here in Australia, in October 2021. As such, it’s important to review your cover and needs before insurers start altering their offerings.

If you’ve had one of these policies for any length of time, you’ve probably seen your premiums increase. That’s because insurers have been struggling to cover large losses on these productsi.

Given ongoing competition and generous features in some products, the Australian Prudential Regulation Authority (APRA) has introduced new rules to ensure income protection cover remains sustainable and affordable for customers.

What is income protection?

Income protection cover protects your most valuable asset – your ability to earn an income. It acts as a replacement income if you are injured or disabled and will help support your family and current lifestyle while you recover.

What’s more, your premiums are generally tax-deductible, so they can potentially help reduce your tax bill.

Major changes to income protection

Reform of income protection policies started back on 1 April 2020, when insurers were no longer permitted to offer customers Agreed Value income protection policies. Agreed value income protection provided more certainty about the amount you would be paid if you claimed and was based on your best 12 months earnings over a three-year period.

Following this initial change, APRA is implementing further changes from 1 October 2021 that will make new income protection policies much less generous. The reforms mean insurers will be offering new policies that base insurance payments on your annual income at the time you make a claim (or the previous 12 months), not on an agreed earnings amount.ii

For people with a fluctuating income, insurance payments will be based on your average annual earnings over a period appropriate for your occupation and will reflect future earnings lost due to the disability.

To further reduce costs, new policies will no longer offer supplementary benefits like specified injury benefits.

Limits on income payments

Other changes include a requirement for the maximum income replacement payment for the first six months to be capped at 90 per cent of earnings, reducing to 70 per cent after six months.ii If your insured income amount excludes superannuation, the Superannuation Guarantee can be paid in addition to the 90 per cent cap.

One of the most significant changes is that the terms and conditions of an existing income protection policy will no longer be guaranteed until age 65. Policies will no longer be offered for longer than five years, so your policy and its terms will be reviewed every five years.

You won’t need to undergo medical review, but any changes to your occupation, financial circumstances or taking up a dangerous pastime will need to be updated in the policy. Even if your circumstances remain the same, you will still be required to review the policy.

If your policy has a long benefit period, you are also likely to face a tighter definition of disability, rather than the previous definition of simply being unable to perform your ‘normal job’. APRA is keen to ensure claimants who are able to return to some form of paid employment do so, rather than remaining at home and receiving a payment.

Impact on existing and new policies

So what does this mean for you?

If you currently have an income protection policy outside your super, you will not be immediately affected by these changes, but it would be wise to check your policy is still appropriate for your circumstances.

Given the extent of the changes to income protection cover, if you have let your insurance lapse or don’t currently have income protection, it could make sense to consider signing up before 1 October 2021 to take advantage of the more generous current arrangements.

Income protection is often overlooked because of a perception that it’s too costly or not essential, but like all insurance, the cost of not being insured can be far greater. This type of cover offers valuable benefits that should be a key component in your wealth creation - and preservation - strategy.

If you would like help reviewing or selecting appropriate income protection cover, call our office today.

i https://www.apra.gov.au/news-and-publications/apra-resumes-work-to-enhance-sustainability-of-individual-disability-income

ii https://www.apra.gov.au/final-individual-disability-income-insurance-sustainability-measures

This article is intended as an information source only and to provide general information only. The comments, examples, words and extracts from legislation and other sources in this publication do not constitute legal advice, financial or tax advice and should not be relied upon as such. All readers should seek advice from a professional adviser regarding the application of any of the comments in this article to their particular situation.


What are the pros and cons of an SMSF?

What are the pros and cons of an SMSF?

Many Australians like the idea of managing and investing their own super. It can make a lot of sense too, but it's definitely not for everyone. We take a look at the arguments for and against setting up your own Self Managed Super Fund (SMSF).

Taking control of your super

People choose to run their own SMSF for many reasons. From a desire for flexible investment choices through to dissatisfaction with their existing super fund, tax and estate planning concerns.

According to a recent SMSF Association survey, many people’s desire for control over their personal retirement income goals and the ability to take control of their financial future are key motivators in the decision to run an SMSF.

For small business owners, the ability to invest in assets related to their business – such as their business premises – is also very appealing.

All these reasons are valid and may make it worth considering an SMSF for your retirement savings.

Benefits of your own super fund

Key benefits are having control over your investment plan and selection of the assets in which your retirement savings are invested.

As an SMSF trustee, you are responsible for developing your fund’s investment strategy, so you get to choose which investment approach to use to grow your money.

There may also be cost savings compared to using a traditional, large super fund.

An SMSF can also give you more flexibility when it comes to tax management and estate planning.

SMSFs can be time consuming

On the other hand, running an SMSF can require significant amounts of time to complete and lodge the necessary paperwork and to meet the strict compliance requirements for super funds.

We can help take a lot of the hard work out of running an SMSF for you and ensure you comply with all the rules. Failing to comply can result in significant penalties.

Although many people enjoy being accountable for their own retirement and tailoring their investments, achieving strong returns requires investment knowledge and skills, plus sufficient time to actively research and manage your investments.

It’s also worth keeping in mind the ATO is the main regulator for SMSFs, so you will have the tax man looking over shoulder.

Are SMSFs cost competitive?

There is no hard and fast rule about the amount of super you need in order for your SMSF to be cost competitive with a large public super fund. Generally, an SMSF is less cost effective if your fund has low member balances.

Smaller balance SMSFs are also less able to achieve sufficient diversification with their assets compared with larger funds, making it harder to spread your investment risk.

Aside from the establishment costs, running your own SMSF incurs annual costs such as the annual ATO supervisory levy, auditing and legal fees, any administrative tasks and any investment-related expenses.

SMSFs can be cheaper

Despite these costs, running your own SMSF can actually be cheaper than using an APRA-regulated super fund to save for retirement.

The SMSF Association’s Cost of Operating SMSFs 2020 report found an SMSF can be cost-competitive with industry and retail super funds when it has an asset balance of $200,000 or more, even for a fund paying for a full administration service. An SMSF with accumulation accounts and a total asset balance of $200,000 using this type of service generally has annual running costs ranging from $1,518 to $3,078.

SMSFs are even more attractive for large asset balances. In fact, the study found an SMSF with a total asset balance of $500,000 or more is generally the cheapest alternative when it comes to a super fund.

For people interested in running their own SMSF but with a balance of only $100,000 to $200,000, you will need to keep an eye on your administration costs and consider what you may be able to manage yourself.

SMSFs with less than $100,000 are not cost-competitive.

If you are interested in controlling your retirement savings, make an appointment to talk to us about us about whether and SMSF is right for you and how we can assist.

This article is intended as an information source only and to provide general information only. The comments, examples, words and extracts from legislation and other sources in this publication do not constitute legal advice, financial or tax advice and should not be relied upon as such. All readers should seek advice from a professional adviser regarding the application of any of the comments in this article to their particular situation.


Achieving financial harmony with loved ones

Love and money: achieving financial harmony

Regardless of whether your finances were impacted the pandemic, if you're in a relationship, your own attitude and your partner's towards finances may have shifted over the last year. Given money's potential to be such a source of conflict in relationships, now is a good time to take stock. It's in both your best interests to ensure you're in sync and on track to maintain or achieve financial harmony.

It's fair to say, COVID-19 has had a far-reaching impact on many aspects of our lives. Fortunately, the Australian economy is proving remarkably resilient. But, personal finances have been affected in different ways by lockdowns and government initiatives.

Check in and see where you stand financially

The first step is knowing where you stand financially. This involves looking through your shared and individual accounts and being open with each other about your saving and spending habits.

This is unlikely to make for a romantic date night given the potential for uncomfortable conversations, which is why one in three Australians admit having kept a financial secret from their partner.i However, by being transparent with your partner, you’ll be working through issues before they snowball into a source of greater financial and relationship stress.

Discuss or re-evaluate your goals

We can all lose track of our end goals, especially when life becomes unpredictable and we need to shift focus. So that you don’t move too far away from your financial goals, re-evaluate your priorities. These may have changed in the past year – maybe you’ve had to halt those travel plans or realised you no longer need or can’t afford that new car.

As you and your partner are two individuals, you might not always be aligned in terms of your approaches to saving and spending. We all have different deeply entrenched views and beliefs around money and it’s one area that you may never completely see eye to eye on. That also goes for goals – we all have our own dreams and ambitions. Maybe one of you sees a need to renovate the bathroom, while the other thinks the money would be better spent on a holiday. Discuss the goals you both have and be prepared for compromise to find a plan that suits the family as a whole.

Re-evaluate your priorities and how you spend

Priorities and spending habits can change over time and more recently, in response to a changed world. In 2020, 56% of Australian households surveyed believed their financial situation was vulnerable or worse due to the pandemic.ii You may have less disposable income and needed to tap into savings or your superannuation or access credit as a result.

It’s important to acknowledge if your financial position has changed, reassess your priorities and make any necessary adjustments. This may involve taking a look at your spending and saving habits and making changes so that your dollars go towards supporting what’s most important to your family. Again, it’s important to discuss this with your partner and work through it together.

Develop a budget

Budgeting is an obvious step, but you’ll need to ensure that the budget works for both of you and supports your shared goals. There are great budgeting apps you can use, but what you’ll both need to bring to the table is a commitment to sticking with the agreed upon budget. Discuss your household needs, such as mortgage or rent payments, utilities, etc, as well as your individual needs and what your shared goals are.

Try to agree on a system that keeps you both accountable. It can be as formal as filling out a spreadsheet every week, or perhaps having a monthly family meeting around how things are tracking and if there’s any room for improvement.

Money talk in relationships can be tricky as it’s often a loaded and emotive topic that can bring up other issues. This is why an adviser can help with these conversations, facilitating discussions in a safe and neutral environment and providing expert advice, tailored to your situation.

Please reach out if we can be of assistance.

i https://www.moneymag.com.au/talk-money-relationships

ii https://www.bt.com.au/insights/perspectives/2020/australian-consumer-spending-changes.html

This article is intended as an information source only and to provide general information only. The comments, examples, words and extracts from legislation and other sources in this publication do not constitute legal advice, financial or tax advice and should not be relied upon as such. All readers should seek advice from a professional adviser regarding the application of any of the comments in this article to their particular situation.


Declutter and tidy up your finances this Autumn

Declutter and tidy up your finances thiis Autumn

Like trees losing their leaves in autumn, why not take a leaf out of their book and choose this time of year to shed some of your own financial baggage.

Taking stock of your accounts and holdings and eliminating what you no longer need will simplify your life and could save you quite a bit in the process.

Here are a few things to put on your check list....

In the style of Marie Kondo, the Japanese organising whizz who has inspired millions to clean out their cupboards, decluttering your finances can bring many benefits.

While you work through all your contracts, investments and commitments, you will no doubt discover many that no longer fit your lifestyle or are simply costing you in unnecessary fees.

And if that is the case, then it is likely that such commitments will not be sparking any joy. And joy is the key criteria Kondo uses to determine whether you hold on to something or let it go.

So how does decluttering work with your finances and where do you start?

Where are you?

The first step is probably to assess where you are right now. That means working out your income and your expenses.

There are many ways to monitor your spending including online apps and the good old-fashioned pen-and-paper method.

Make sure you capture all your expenditure as some can be hidden these days with buy now pay later, credit card and online shopping purchases.

The next step is to organise your expenditure in order of necessity. At the top of the list would be housing, then utilities, transport, food, health and education. After that, you move on to those discretionary items such as clothes, hairdressing and entertainment.

Work through the list determining what you can keep, what you can discard and what you can adapt to your changed needs. Remember, if it doesn’t spark joy then you should probably get rid of it.

Weed out excess accounts

Now you need to look at the methods you use when spending. Decluttering can include cancelling multiple credit cards and consolidating your purchases into the one card. This has a twofold impact: firstly, you will be able to control your spending better; and secondly, it may well cut your costs by shedding multiple fees.

Another area where multiple accounts can take their toll is super. Consider consolidating your accounts into one. Not only can this make it easier to keep track of, but it will save money on duplicate fees and insurance. If you think you may have long forgotten super accounts, search for them on the Australian Tax Office’s lost super website. Since July 2019, super providers must transfer inactive accounts to the tax office.

Once you have reviewed your superannuation, the next step is to check that your investments match your risk profile and your retirement plans. If they aren’t aligned, then it’s likely they will not spark much joy in the future when you start drawing down your retirement savings.

If you have many years before retirement and can tolerate some risk, you may consider being reasonably aggressive in your investment choice as you will have sufficient time to ride investment cycles. You can gradually reduce risk in the years leading up to and following retirement.

Sort through your insurances

Another area to check is insurance. While insurance, whether in or out of super, may not spark much joy, you will be over the moon should you ever need to make a claim and have the right cover in place.

When it comes to insurance, make sure your cover reflects your life stage. For instance, if you have recently bought a home or had a child, you may need to increase your life insurance cover to protect your family. Or if your mortgage is paid off and the kids have left home, you might decide to reduce your cover.

Prune your investments

If you also have investments outside your super, they too might benefit from some decluttering. As the end of the financial year approaches, now is a good time to look at your portfolio, sell underperforming assets and generally rebalance your investments.

Many people who have applied Marie Kondo’s decluttering rules to their possessions talk about the feeling of freedom and release it engenders. It may well be that applying the same logic to your finances gets you one step closer to financial freedom.

If you would like to review or make changes to your finances, why not call us to discuss.

This article is intended as an information source only and to provide general information only. The comments, examples, words and extracts from legislation and other sources in this publication do not constitute legal advice, financial or tax advice and should not be relied upon as such. All readers should seek advice from a professional adviser regarding the application of any of the comments in this article to their particular situation.


Need to boost retirement income? There's more than one way to do it...

There's more than one way to boost your retirement income

Retirees are often reluctant to eat into their “nest egg” too quickly. This is understandable, given we're living longer than ever and may need to pay for aged care and health costs later in life. But this cautious approach also means many retirees are living more frugally than they need to according to the Government's recent Retirement Income Review.

One of its key findings was that most people die with the bulk of the wealth they had at retirement intact.i.

One of the benefits of advice is that we can help you plan your retirement income so you know how much you can afford to spend today, secure in the knowledge that your future needs are covered.

Minimum super pension withdrawals

Under superannuation legislation, once you retire and transfer your super into a pension account, you must withdraw a minimum amount each year. This amount increases from 4 per cent of your account balance for retirees aged under 65 to 14 per cent for those aged 95 and over. (These rates have been halved temporarily for the 2020 and 2021 financial years due to COVID-19.)

One of the common misconceptions about our retirement system, according to the Retirement Income Review, is that these minimum drawdowns are what the Government recommends. Instead, they are there to ensure retirees use their super to fund their retirement, rather than as a store of tax-advantaged wealth to pass down the generations.

In practice, super is unlikely to be your only source of retirement income.

The three pillars

Most retirees live on a combination of Age Pension topped up with income from super and other investments – the so-called three pillars of our retirement system. Yet despite compulsory super being around for almost 30 years, over 70 per cent of people aged 66 and over still receive a full or part-Age Pension.

While the Retirement Income Review found most of today’s retirees have adequate retirement income, it argued they could do better. Not by saving more, but by using what they have more efficiently.

Withdrawing more of your super nest egg is one way of improving retirement outcomes, but for those who could still do with extra income the answer could lie in your nest.

Unlocking housing wealth

Australian retirees are some of the wealthiest in the world, with median household wealth of around $1.4 million. Yet close to $1 million of this wealth is tied up in the family home.

That’s a lot of money to leave to the kids, especially when many retirees end up living in homes that are too large while they struggle to afford the retirement lifestyle they had hoped for.

For these reasons there is growing interest in ways that allow retirees to tap into their home equity. Of course, not everyone will want or need to take advantage of these options. But if you are looking for ways to use your home to generate retirement income, but don’t relish the thought of welcoming Airbnb guests, here are some options:

Downsizer contributions to your super. If you are aged 65 or older and sell your home, perhaps to buy something smaller, you may be able to put up to $300,000 of the proceeds into super (up to $600,000 for couples).

The Pension Loans Scheme (PLS). Offered by the government via Centrelink, the PLS allows older Australians to receive tax-free fortnightly income by taking out a loan against the equity in their home. The loan plus interest (currently 4.5 per cent per year) is repaid when you sell or after your death.

Reverse Mortgages (also called equity release or home equity schemes). Similar to the PLS but offered by commercial providers. Unlike the PLS, drawdowns can be taken as a lump sum, income stream or line of credit but this flexibility comes at the cost of higher interest rates.

The big picture

While super is important, for most people it’s not the only source of retirement income.

If you would like to discuss your retirement income needs and how to make the most of your assets, give us a call.

i Retirement Income Review, https://treasury.gov.au/sites/default/files/2020-11/p2020-100554-complete-report.pdf

This article is intended as an information source only and to provide general information only. The comments, examples, words and extracts from legislation and other sources in this publication do not constitute legal advice, financial or tax advice and should not be relied upon as such. All readers should seek advice from a professional adviser regarding the application of any of the comments in this article to their particular situation.


Income protection and life insurance cover falling short: how safe is your family's future?

Income protection and life insurance cover falling short: how safe is your family's future?

Are you confident the life insurance or total and permanent Disability cover attached to your super will support your family if things go wrong? If so, it may be worth checking how well you're actually covered.

Life insurance is all about ensuring your family can maintain their lifestyle if you were to die or become seriously ill. Even people who do have some level of protection, might discover a significant shortfall if they had to depend on their current life insurance policies.

That’s because 70 per cent of Australians who have life insurance hold relatively low default levels of cover through superannuation.

Default cover may not be enough

The most common types of default life insurance cover in super are:

• Life cover (also called death cover) which pays a lump sum or income stream to your dependents if you die or have a terminal illness.

• Total and permanent disability (TPD) cover which pays you a benefit if you are disabled and unlikely to work again.

If you have basic default cover and are part of what is considered an “average” household with no children, then it’s likely you only have enough to meet about 65-70 per cent of your total needs. The figure is much lower for families with children. Indeed, a recent study by Rice Warner estimates that while current levels of insurance cover 92 per cent of death needs, they only account for a paltry 29 per cent of TPD needs.i

Such a shortfall means that you and/or your family would not be able to maintain your current lifestyle.

A fall in cover

The Rice Warner study found the amount people actually insured for death cover has fallen 17 per cent and 19 per cent for TPD in the two years from June 2018 to June 2020. This was driven by a drop in group insurance within super which has fallen 27 per cent for death cover and 29 per cent for TPD cover.

This was largely a result of the introduction of the Protecting Your Super legislation. If you are young or your super account is inactive then you may no longer have insurance cover automatically included in your super. You’ll now need to advise your fund should you require cover.

It may make sense not to have high levels of cover, or even insurance at all, when you are young with no dependents and few liabilities – no mortgage, no debt and maybe few commitments. But if you work in a high-risk occupation such as the mining or construction industries, or have dependents, then having no cover could prove costly.

Another reason for the fall in life insurance cover has been the advent of COVID-19. With many people looking for cost-cutting measures to help them through tough times, insurance is sometimes viewed as dispensable. But this could be false economy as this may be exactly the time when you need cover the most.

There is also the belief that life insurance is expensive which is certainly not the case should you ever need to make a claim.ii

An appropriate level of cover for you

It is estimated that an average 30-year-old needs $561,000 in death cover and $874,000 in TPD cover. As you and your family get older, your insurance needs diminish but they are still substantial. So a 50-year-old needs approximately $207,000 in death cover and $499,000 in TPD.

These figures are just for basic cover so may not meet your personal lifestyle. When working out an appropriate level of cover, you need to consider your mortgage, your utility bills, the children’s education, your daily living expenses, your car and your general lifestyle.

It’s also important to consider your stage of life. Clearly the impact of lost income through death or incapacity is much greater when your mortgage is still high, your children are younger, and you haven’t had time to build up savings.

While having some life insurance may be better than nothing, having sufficient cover is the only way to fully protect your family. So why not call us to find out if your current life and TPD cover is enough for you and your family to continue to enjoy your standard of living come what may?

Now more than ever, in these uncertain times, you may find that you too are significantly underinsured and need to make changes.

i https://www.ricewarner.com/new-research-shows-a-larger-underinsurance-gap/
(All figures in this article are sourced from this Rice Warner report.)

ii https://www.acuitymag.com/finance/confusion-around-life-insurance-leaves-australians-vulnerable-nobleoak

This article is intended as an information source only and to provide general information only. The comments, examples, words and extracts from legislation and other sources in this publication do not constitute legal advice, financial or tax advice and should not be relied upon as such. All readers should seek advice from a professional adviser regarding the application of any of the comments in this article to their particular situation.


Facing redundancy? What to do and how to make the most of it

Facing redundancy? What to do and how to make the most of it.

Hopefully it will never happen to you. But with the eonomic fallout from COVID still being felt, it pays not to take employment for granted.

Should you suddenly find yourself facing redundancy, here are a few things to consider.

If you are offered redundancy, how can you turn a potentially bad situation into a new opportunity?

In the first instance, make sure that you negotiate a good redundancy settlement. By law you are entitled to a certain amount depending on your years of service with the company.i You may or may not come under an award, but the Fair Work ombudsman has a calculator so you can work out your entitlement.

You may even be able to negotiate an increased payment (a golden handshake) in order to keep confidential any specialist knowledge that you may have.

Your redundancy payment may include long service leave, holiday pay and sick leave, so it can be a sizeable amount and that creates opportunity.

How is it taxed?

But first, how much will you end up with after tax? There is a tax-free element for redundancy payments, calculated as a base amount (currently $10,989) plus a service amount ($5,496) multiplied by the numbers of years of service. So, if you have 10 years’ service, your tax-free amount is $65,949.ii

Any redundancy payment above this amount is your Employment Termination Payment (ETP) and subject to tax. If you are below your preservation age (the age at which you can access your super) you would pay 30 per cent plus the Medicare levy on this sum or 15 per cent plus Medicare if you are older than your preservation age. In both cases this tax rate applies up to $210,000 with the balance subject to 45 per cent tax plus Medicare regardless of your age.iii

So what should you do with this money? A large sum can present many opportunities although much will depend on your present circumstances such as how close you are to retirement and what your financial commitments are.

If you are hoping to find another job, assume this could take at least six months, so make sure you have sufficient funds.

Now is the time to take stock of your household budget and look at ways to reduce your overheads to control your immediate demands. For instance, you may look at selling your second car.

But don’t rush to cancel everything. Indeed, your income protection policy, for instance, could still play an important role. Before you act, ask your insurer if they would consider waiving the premiums for a few months. Just because you have lost your job, does not mean you will not be covered if something should preclude you from working in another job. You may well find you are still covered even if you are not currently employed.

Look to the future

Depending on your circumstances, you could consider using some of your redundancy payout to improve your overall financial situation. You could reduce your mortgage and other debts, or perhaps to make an investment or fund a business opportunity.

If you are approaching retirement age, then you might consider putting some of your redundancy pay into super. While this may still be a good idea if you are younger, remember you could be unemployed for longer than six months and you wouldn’t want your money locked in super until you reach preservation age.

If you are still expecting to have a few more years in the workforce, then take the time to seek professional help on your next move and think outside the square. So, rather than just find a similar position to the one you have lost in the same industry, look at widening your horizons. A professional career advisor can help. In many cases, employers provide such assistance as part of a redundancy package.

While redundancy can be confronting, if you think of it as a catalyst for change then you may find it’s one of the best things that has happened to you.

Call us to discuss how to make the most of your redundancy payment.

i https://www.fairwork.gov.au/ending-employment/redundancy/redundancy-pay-and-entitlements

ii https://www.ato.gov.au/business/your-workers/in-detail/taxation-of-termination-payments/?page=4

iii https://www.etax.com.au/employment-termination-payment/

This article is intended as an information source only and to provide general information only. The comments, examples, words and extracts from legislation and other sources in this publication do not constitute legal advice, financial or tax advice and should not be relied upon as such. All readers should seek advice from a professional adviser regarding the application of any of the comments in this article to their particular situation.