Responsible investing on the rise - a new boom?

Responsible investing on the rise - a new boom?

For many people, there’s much more to choosing investments than focusing exclusively on financial returns. Returns are important, but a growing number of people also want their investments align with their values. Here's what you should know.

Everyone’s values are different but given the choice, most people would wish to make a positive difference to their community and/or the planet. Or at least to do no harm.

Indeed, four out of five Australians believe environmental issues are important when it comes to their investment decisions.i

As a result, there has been a surge in what is called responsible investing. Also known as ethical or sustainable investing, responsible investing includes investments that support and benefit the environment and society, rather than those whose products or way of conducting business have a negative impact on the world.

Millennials driving growth in sustainability

The trend toward responsible investment is growing rapidly. According to the Responsible Investment Association of Australasia (RIAA), Australians invested $1.2 trillion in responsible assets in 2020.ii While money flowing into Australian sustainable investment funds was up an estimated 66 per cent in the year to June 2021.iii

Responsible investing is particularly popular among millennials, now in their late 20s and 30s and beginning to get serious about building wealth. Many in this group are getting a foot on the investment ladder via exchange-traded funds (ETFs). A recent survey of the Australian ETF market found 28 per cent of younger investors had requested more ethical investments.iv

More sustainable investment options

As awareness of responsible investing grows, so does the availability of sustainable investment options, beginning with your super fund.

Most large super funds these days offer a sustainable option on their investment menu. While relatively rare even 10 years ago, the availability and performance of sustainable options has grown strongly over the past three to five years.

According to independent research group, SuperRatings, the top performing sustainable options now surpass their typical balanced style counterparts in some cases.v

If you run your own self-managed super fund (SMSF) or wish to invest outside super, there is a growing number of managed funds that actively select sustainable investments, or ETFs that passively track an index or sector.

There were 135 sustainable funds in Australia and New Zealand in 2021, so there is plenty of choice.iii

How to screen

So how do you find the ethical investments that best suit your values?

There are several methods used with the most common being negative screening. This is where you exclude investments in companies engaged in unwelcomed activities such as gambling, tobacco, firearms, animal cruelty, human rights abuses or fossil fuels.

Positive screening is the opposite, where you actively seek out investments in companies making a positive contribution. Some examples might be companies involved in renewable energy, health care or education.

Another criterion is to look at companies that monitor their environmental, social and governance risks. This cuts across all industries and is more about the way the company conducts its business.

Environmentally they may monitor their carbon emissions or pursue clean technology, socially they may be active in ensuring a safe workplace and on the governance front they may pursue board diversity or anti-corruption policies.

Greenwashing on the rise

As the popularity of responsible investing grows, so do concerns about the practice of so-called greenwashing. This is where a company or fund overrepresents the extent to which its practices live up to their promises. The Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC) recently announced a review into the use of greenwashing in Australia, prompted in part by the demand for such funds.iii

Another trend is impact investing in companies or organisations helping to finance solutions to some of society’s biggest challenges. This might include investments in areas such as affordable housing or sustainable agriculture.

Solid returns

While some investors are driven by their values alone, many more want value for their money. The good news is that it’s possible to have it both ways.

The RIAA survey found super funds that engage in responsible investments outperformed their peers over one, three and five years. Clearly responsible investing is a trend that is gaining momentum, with the financial performance of sustainable investments attracting a wider following.

If you would like to discuss your investment options and how they might fit within your overall portfolio

i https://www.canstar.com.au/investor-hub/ethical-investing/

ii https://responsibleinvestment.org/resources/benchmark-report/

iii https://www.morningstar.com.au/funds/article/australias-sustainable-funds-market-is-growin/214505

iv https://www.betashares.com.au/insights/millennials-on-top-betashares-investment-trends-etf-report-2020/

v https://www.lonsec.com.au/2021/07/21/media-release-stellar-fy21-returns-as-super-funds-deliver-for-their-members/

This article is intended as an information source only and to provide general information only. The comments, examples, words and extracts from legislation and other sources in this publication do not constitute legal advice, financial or tax advice and should not be relied upon as such. All readers should seek advice from a professional adviser regarding the application of any of the comments in this article to their particular situation.


what are franking credits

Franking Credits In Australia: What Are They and How Do They Work?

what are franking credits

Franking Credits In Australia: What Are They and How Do They Work?

Australian shares are popular investments with self-funded retirees and anyone who depends on income from their investments, due in part to the favourable tax treatment of franked dividends.

After falling off in the early days of the COVID pandemic, share prices and dividends bounced back strongly in the year to June 2021.

Investors who depend on income from their shares also have more certainty now that the Labor Party has dropped its opposition to cash refunds of excess franking credits, a policy that attracted fierce resistance from retirees at the last federal election.

The hunt for yield

In a low interest rate environment, dividend yields on Australian shares compare favourably with near-zero interest rates on bank term deposits and historically low yields on government bonds.

Over the past 40 years, the dividend yield on Australian shares has averaged just over four per cent and many stocks pay more, (dividend yield is the sum of dividends over the past 12 months divided by the current share price). In fact, dividends account for roughly half the total return from Australian shares over the past 20 years.i

These dividend yields are even more attractive when the tax benefits of franking credits are included, especially for investors in retirement phase.

What are franking credits?

Franking credits represent tax a company has already paid in Australia on any profits it distributes to shareholders by way of dividends. The company tax rate in Australia is currently 30 per cent, or 25 per cent for companies with turnover of less than $50 million.

Shareholders can then use these franking credits, also known as imputation credits, to offset their tax liability on other income, including salary, at the end of the financial year. People who pay no tax, such as investors in retirement phase, can claim a full tax refund from the ATO.

If your marginal tax rate is less than the company tax rate of 30 per cent, you may be eligible to receive a refund of the difference between the franking credit and your tax payable.

This is one reason SMSFs are so attracted to shares in Australian companies that pay fully franked dividends. Super funds pay a top income tax rate of 15% and no tax on the earnings or income of investments supporting a retirement pension.

Am I eligible for a tax refund?

You may be eligible for a refund of excess franking credits if all the following apply:

• You receive franked dividends on or after 1 July 2000 either directly or through a trust or partnership

• Your basic tax liability is less than your franking credits, after taking into account any other tax offsets you are entitled to.

• You meet the ATO’s anti-avoidance rules, designed to ensure everyone pays their fair share of tax.
You will also need to keep dividend statements from companies that paid franked dividends to support your claims.

So how does franking work?

Franking credits have different impacts depending on your marginal tax rate and whether your share investments are held inside or outside super.

Say you own shares in a company which pays a fully franked dividend of $700. Your dividend statement says there is a franking credit of $300, which represents tax the company has already paid. This means the dividend before company tax was deducted would have been $1,000 ($700 + $300).

In your annual tax return, you must declare the full $1,000 in your taxable income. The after-tax value of the dividend will then depend on your marginal tax rate.

If you hold the shares in an SMSF tax-free pension account, you will receive a total dividend payment of $1,000, $700 dividend plus a full cash refund of the attached franking credits.

If you hold the shares in an SMSF accumulation account (with 15% tax), you will receive $850, $700 dividend plus a $150 cash refund of franking credits.

If you hold the shares in your own name there will be some tax to pay on your dividend income, but significantly less than you would otherwise have paid without franking credits.

If you would like to discuss the taxation of share dividends and the role they play in your overall investment strategy, please give us a call.

i https://www.bt.com.au/personal/smsf/manage-your-smsf/investment-insights/the-search-for-dividend-yield-in-a-low-growth-environment.html

This article is intended as an information source only and to provide general information only. The comments, examples, words and extracts from legislation and other sources in this publication do not constitute legal advice, financial or tax advice and should not be relied upon as such. All readers should seek advice from a professional adviser regarding the application of any of the comments in this article to their particular situation.


Investing lessons from the COVID pandemic

Investing lessons from the COVID pandemic

When the coronavirus pandemic hit financial markets in March 2020, almost 40 per cent was wiped off the value of shares in less than a month.i Understandably, many investors hit the panic button and switched to cash or withdrew savings from superannuation.

With the benefit of hindsight, some people may be regretting acting in haste.

As it happened, shares rebounded faster than anyone dared predict. Australian shares rose 28 per cent in the year to June 2020 while global shares rose 37 per cent. Balanced growth super funds returned 18 per cent for the year, their best performance in 24 years.ii

While every financial crisis is different, some investment rules are timeless. So, what are the lessons of the last 18 months?

Lesson #1 Ignore the noise

When markets suffer a major fall as they did last year, the sound can be deafening. From headlines screaming bloodbath, to friends comparing the fall in their super account balance and their dashed retirement hopes.

Yet as we have seen, markets and market sentiment can swing quickly. That’s because on any given day markets don’t just reflect economic fundamentals but the collective mood swings of all the buyers and sellers. In the long run though, the underlying value of investments generally outweighs short-term price fluctuations.

One of the key lessons of the past 18 months is that ignoring the noisy doomsayers and focussing on long-term investing is better for your wealth.

Lesson #2 Stay diversified

Another lesson is the importance of diversification. By spreading your money across and within asset classes you can minimise the risk of one bad investment or short-term fall in one asset class wiping out your savings.

Diversification also helps smooth out your returns in the long run. For example, in the year to June 2020, Australian shares and listed property fell sharply, but positive returns from bonds and cash acted as a buffer reducing the overall loss of balanced growth super funds to 0.5%.

The following 12 months to June 2021 shares and property bounced back strongly, taking returns of balanced growth super funds to 18 per cent. But investors who switched to cash at the depths of the market despair in March last year would have gone backwards after fees and tax.

More importantly, over the past 10 years balanced growth funds have returned 8.6 per cent per year on average after tax and investment fees.ii

The mix of investments you choose will depend on your age and tolerance for risk. The younger you are, the more you can afford to have in more aggressive assets that carry a higher level of risk, such as shares and property to grow your wealth over the long term. But even retirees can benefit from having some of their savings in growth assets to help replenish their nest egg even as they withdraw income.

Lesson #3 Stay the course

The Holy Grail of investing is to buy at the bottom of the market and sell when it peaks. If only it were that easy. Even the most experienced fund managers acknowledge that investors with a balanced portfolio should expect a negative return one year in every five or so.

Even if you had seen the writing on the wall in February 2020 and switched to cash, it’s unlikely you would have switched back into shares in time to catch the full benefit of the upswing that followed.

Timing the market on the way in and the way out is extremely difficult, if not impossible.

Looking ahead

Every new generation of investors has a pivotal experience where lessons are learned. For older investors, it may have been the crash of ’87, the tech wreck of the early 2000s or the global financial crisis. For younger investors and some older ones too, the coronavirus pandemic will be a defining moment in their investing journey.

By choosing an asset allocation that aligns with your age and risk tolerance then staying the course, you can sail through the market highs and lows with your sights firmly set on your investment horizon. Of course, that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t make adjustments or take advantage of opportunities along the way.

We’re here to guide you through the highs and lows of investing, so give us a call if you would like to discuss your investment strategy.

i https://www.forbes.com/sites/lizfrazierpeck/2021/02/11/the-coronavirus-crash-of-2020-and-the-investing-lesson-it-taught-us/?sh=241a03a46cfc

ii https://www.chantwest.com.au/resources/super-funds-post-a-stunning-gain

This article is intended as an information source only and to provide general information only. The comments, examples, words and extracts from legislation and other sources in this publication do not constitute legal advice, financial or tax advice and should not be relied upon as such. All readers should seek advice from a professional adviser regarding the application of any of the comments in this article to their particular situation.


What's up with inflation?

What's up with inflation?

Fears of a resurgence in inflation has been the big topic of conversation among bond and sharemarket commentators lately, which may come as a surprise to many given that our rate of inflation is just 1.1 per cent. Yet despite market rumblings, the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) appears quite comfortable about the outlook.

Inflation is a symptom of rising consumer prices, measured in Australia by the Consumer Price Index (CPI). The RBA has an inflation target of 2-3 per cent a year, which it regards as a level to achieve its goals of price stability, full employment and prosperity for Australia.

Currently the RBA expects inflation to be 1.5 per cent this year in Australia, rising to 2 per cent by mid-2023.i Until the inflation rate returns to the 2-3 per cent mark, the RBA has said it will not lift the cash rate.

US inflation rising

The situation is a little different overseas where inflation has spiked higher. For instance, US inflation shot up to an annual rate of 5 per cent in May, the fastest pace since 2008, up from 4.2 per cent in April.ii As experienced investors would be aware, markets hate surprises. So with inflation rising faster than anticipated, share and bond markets are on edge.

But just like the RBA, the Federal Reserve views this spike as temporary, pointing to it being a natural reaction after the fall in prices last year during the worst days of the COVID crisis. In addition, companies underestimated demand for their goods during the pandemic and as a result there are now bottlenecks in supply that are putting upward pressure on prices.

The central banks believe that once economies get over the kickstart from all the government stimulation, inflation will fall back into line. After all, most world economies went backwards last year, so any growth should be viewed as a good thing and more than likely a temporary event.

But markets are not convinced.

Inflation and wages

Market pundits argue that if businesses must pay more for materials and running costs such as electricity then these increases will most likely be passed on to the consumer.

That’s all very well if your wages also rise, but if your income remains static then your standard of living will go backwards as you will have to spend more money to buy the same goods.

This then becomes a vicious circle. If the cost of living rises, then you will seek higher wages; this will the put further pressure on the costs for businesses. They will then have to increase their prices further to cover the higher wages bill. Some companies may react by reducing staff levels which will lead to higher unemployment.

Impact on investment

Inflation can also have a negative impact on investors because it reduces their real rate of return. That is, the gross return on an investment minus the rate of inflation.

Rising prices and interest rates also impact company profits. With companies facing higher costs, the outlook for corporate earnings growth comes under pressure.

But not all stocks are affected the same. Companies that produce food and other essentials are not as sensitive to inflation because we all need to eat. Mining companies also benefit from rising prices for the commodities they produce. Whereas high growth stocks like technology companies traditionally suffer from rising interest rates.

Markets current fear is that central banks will tighten monetary policy faster than expected. Interest rates will rise, money will tighten, and this will fuel higher inflation.

Bond market fallout

Expectations of higher inflation has already seen the bond market react, with the 10-year bond yield in both Australia and the US on the rise since October last year.

If yields rise, then the value of bonds actually fall. This is particularly concerning for fixed income investors. Not only are you faced with the prospect of capital losses because the price of your existing bond holdings generally falls when rates rise, but the purchasing power of your income will also be reduced as inflation takes its toll. Investments in inflation-linked bonds should fare better in an inflationary environment.

Inflation is part of the economic cycle. Keeping it under control is the key to a well-run economy and that is where central banks play their role.

Call us if you would like to discuss how an uptick in inflation may be impacting your overall investment strategy.

i https://www.rba.gov.au/media-releases/2021/mr-21-09.html

ii https://tradingeconomics.com/united-states/inflation-cpi

This article is intended as an information source only and to provide general information only. The comments, examples, words and extracts from legislation and other sources in this publication do not constitute legal advice, financial or tax advice and should not be relied upon as such. All readers should seek advice from a professional adviser regarding the application of any of the comments in this article to their particular situation.


The financial rewards of optimism

The financial rewards of optimism

There’s no doubt, life has a way of presenting us with the odd difficult challenge now and again. But approaching whatever ups and downs we face with a positive mindset can improve our lives in many ways.

Having a positive outlook not only improves our health and wellbeing, it can also have a meaningful and very positive impact on our finances.

How optimism can improve our finances

If you have a cautious or anxious approach to your finances, such as worrying you’ll never have enough money or being wary of spending, it will likely come as a surprise to hear that being optimistic can improve your financial situation.

A recent study connected the link between financial well-being and an optimistic mindset, finding that people who classify themselves as optimists enjoy 62 per cent fewer days of financial stress per year compared to pessimists.

Superior financial well-being

When you are positive in your outlook, you are also much more likely to follow better financial habits in managing your money. Optimists tend to save for major purchases, with around 90 percent of optimists having saved for a significant purchase, be it a car, a house or an overseas holiday, compared to pessimists at just 70 per cent.i

However, optimism does not equal naivety and optimists still tend to have contingency plans in place for unforeseen events that may detrimentally impact their bottom line. Some 66 per cent of optimists had an emergency fund, compared to under 50 percent of the pessimists.i

This goes to show that maintaining an optimistic approach to your finances does still involve planning for the future. By being prepared, you’ll reduce the stress that comes from feeling the rug could be pulled from beneath you without a safety net.

Your career and earning capacity

An optimistic approach to life and your career leads to achieving greater career success and the financial rewards that come with being successful in your job.

Optimists are 40 percent more likely than pessimists to receive a promotion within a space of twelve months and up to six times more predisposed to being highly engaged in their chosen career.i

Changing your attitude

Knowing that optimism is great for your wallet and your health is one thing, but how do you shift your outlook? If you’re prone to worry, focussing on pessimistic outcomes or a bit of a sceptic, looking on the bright side of life can seem easier said than done.

It is possible to nurture optimism, and you get this opportunity every day. Cultivating optimism can be as simple as adopting optimistic behaviours.

So, what are the financial behaviours of optimists that we can emulate?

Optimists tend to be more comfortable talking about and learning about money and are more likely to follow expert financial advice than their more pessimistic peers.

Positive people display a correspondingly positive approach to their finances. They tend to put plans in place and have the courage to dream big. You don’t have to be too ambitious in how you carry out those plans, every small step you take will help you to get where you want to be.

Everyone experiences setbacks at various times, however optimists rise to these challenges, learning from their past mistakes and persisting in their endeavours. Don’t be too hard on yourself if you are experiencing difficulties. We all face challenges and during these times, focus on solutions rather than just the problems, be conscious of your “internal talk” and don’t be afraid to seek out support. It’s important to focus on what you can do differently going forward, this could be as simple as working towards a “rainy day” fund.

It’s never too late to change your outlook. By embracing optimism, you can reap the rewards that a more positive outlook provides.

i https://www.optforoptimism.com/optimism/optimismresearch.pdf/

This article is intended as an information source only and to provide general information only. The comments, examples, words and extracts from legislation and other sources in this publication do not constitute legal advice, financial or tax advice and should not be relied upon as such. All readers should seek advice from a professional adviser regarding the application of any of the comments in this article to their particular situation.


Understanding Bitcoin, Cryptocurrencies and Blockchain - A Quick Overview for Australian Investors

Understanding Bitcoin, Cryptocurrencies and Blockchain – A Quick Overview for Australian Investors

Whether it’s the skyrocketing price of Bitcoin, or record-breaking prices for investments bought with digital currencies, cryptocurrencies continue to feature in the media and dinner conversations everywhere. This has reignited debate about whether we are witnessing an old-fashioned bubble about to burst or a new asset class in the making.

The price of Bitcoin has gone from around $13,800 a year ago to a recent high of $84,350.i Undoubtedly, some people have made money on the way up, but experts urge caution. While cryptocurrencies are being accepted more widely, the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC) warns they are high risk, difficult to value and unregulated.*ii

You may also have seen recently that a digital artist known as Beeple sold a work at auction for $89 million, while Twitter founder Jack Dorsey sold his first tweet for $3.8 million. Both were paid for in cryptocurrencies in a trend called non-fungible tokens (NFTs).iii NFTs are a unique bit of digital code that cannot be duplicated or counterfeited, making them particularly attractive for collectors.

Cryptocurrencies and NFTs have one thing in common – they are both enabled by a technology called blockchain.

What is blockchain?

Blockchain is a system of recording and storing information that helps keep track of ownership securely and transparently.

It is essentially a digital ledger of transactions stored in blocks that is duplicated and distributed across a network of computer systems forming a blockchain. Every new transaction that occurs on the blockchain is added to every participant’s ledger.

This means if one block in the chain is changed, it would be immediately apparent that it had been tampered with, making it near impossible to change, hack or cheat the system.

History teaches us that fortunes are more likely to be made selling shovels to miners in a goldrush, than buying a shovel and joining them. So could it be that long-term value is more likely to come from investing in the underlying blockchain technology than chasing quick profits from the likes of Bitcoin and NFTs?

Given rising concerns about hacking and data breaches, it’s no surprise that blockchain is being embraced by government and businesses alike.

Government backs digital technologies

In the 2020 Federal Budget, the Australian government set aside $800 million to invest in digital technologies, including blockchain technology pilots to cut business compliance costs.iv

This followed the launch two years ago of the government’s National Blockchain Roadmap, developed in collaboration with industry and universities to highlight the technology’s potential to save businesses money and open new business and export opportunities.

According to the Roadmap, blockchain technology is predicted to generate an annual business value of over US$175 billion by 2025. By 2023, blockchain will support the global movement and tracking of US$2 trillion worth of goods and services annually. By next year, it is predicted to save the financial services industry US$15-20 billion annually.v

Practical uses of blockchain

In Australia, the biggest user of blockchain is the financial services industry. For example, the Australian Securities Exchange (ASX) is working on a new blockchain system to finalise local equity trades which will replace the old CHESS system in early 2022.

But it also has applications across the economy in sectors including trade, logistics, real estate, energy, water, resources and agriculture. The cost to Australian food and wine producers of direct product counterfeiting and substitution was estimated to be over $1.7 billion in 2017 alone.vi

Take the example of the wine industry. Blockchain can help with inventory tracking, facilitate automated payments between supply chain members, and reduce counterfeiting through provenance transparency.

Investment opportunities

Thanks to government and industry support, a growing number of blockchain companies are listing on the ASX. There are companies using blockchain to:

• Keep track of financial data and identity documents for compliance

• Verify human engagement on social media to prevent interaction with bots and fake profiles

• Make supply chains transparent in combination with artificial intelligence technology.vi
Other companies have integrated blockchain into parts of their business to enhance security on digital platforms or to accept and settle payments.

While the local ASX-listed technology sector is still relatively small and high risk, it does offer investors increasing opportunities to invest in cutting-edge technologies with real world applications.

If you would like to discuss your overall investment strategy, don’t hesitate to get in touch.

i https://au.finance.yahoo.com/quote/BTC-AUD/history/?guccounter=1

ii https://moneysmart.gov.au/investment-warnings/cryptocurrencies-and-icos

iii https://www.businessinsider.com.au/what-are-risks-of-investing-in-nft-2021-3

iv https://www.coindesk.com/australia-to-spend-575m-on-tech-including-blockchain-to-boost-pandemic-recovery

v https://www.industry.gov.au/sites/default/files/2020-02/national-blockchain-roadmap.pdf?ref=hackernoon.com

vi https://stockhead.com.au/tech/these-asx-blockchain-companies-are-leading-the-distributed-ledger-race/
*NB: We cannot advise clients on investments in Bitcoin or any other cryptocurrency as they are not regulated financial products.

This article is intended as an information source only and to provide general information only. The comments, examples, words and extracts from legislation and other sources in this publication do not constitute legal advice, financial or tax advice and should not be relied upon as such. All readers should seek advice from a professional adviser regarding the application of any of the comments in this article to their particular situation.


Rising bond yields and inflation. What does this mean for your investments?

Rising bond yields and inflation. What does this mean for your investments?

Bond yields have risen sharply since the start of 2021. There's deep concern in the markets at the spectre of inflation caused by massive government spending programs across the globe. But what does this mean for your investments?

US 10-year government bond yields touched 1.61 per cent in early March after starting the year at 0.9 per cent.i Australian 10-year bonds followed suit, jumping from 0.97 per cent at the start of the year to a recent high of 1.81 per cent.ii

That may not seem like much, but to bond watchers it’s significant. Rates have since settled a little lower, but the market is still jittery.

Why are bond yields rising?

Bond yields have been rising due to concerns that global economic growth, and inflation, may bounce back faster and higher than previously expected.

While a return to more ‘normal’ business activity after the pandemic is a good thing, there are fears that massive government stimulus and central bank bond buying programs may reinflate national economies too quickly.

The risk of inflation

Despite short-term interest rates languishing close to zero, a sharp rise in long-term interest rates indicates investors are readjusting their expectations of future inflation. Australia’s inflation rate currently sits at 0.9 per cent, half the long bond yield.

To quash inflation fears, Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) Governor Philip Lowe recently repeated his intention to keep interest rates low until 2024. The RBA cut official rates to a record low of 0.1 per cent last year and launched a $200 billion program to buy government bonds with the aim of keeping yields on these bonds at record lows.iii

Governor Lowe said inflation (currently 0.9 per cent) would not be anywhere near the RBA’s target of between 2 and 3 per cent until annual wages growth rises above 3 per cent from 1.4 per cent now. This would require unemployment falling closer to 4 per cent from the current 6.4 per cent.

In other words, there’s some arm wrestling going on between central banks and the market over whose view of inflation and interest rates will prevail, with no clear winner.

What does this mean for investors?

Bond prices have been falling because investors are concerned that rising inflation will erode the value of the yields on their existing bond holdings, so they sell.

For income investors, falling bond prices could mean capital losses as the value of their existing bond holdings is eroded by rising rates, but healthier income in future.

The prospect of higher interest rates also has implications for other investments.

Shares shaken but not stirred

In recent years, low interest rates have sent investors flocking to shares for their dividend yields and capital growth. In 2020, US shares led the charge with the tech-heavy Nasdaq index up 43.6%.iv

It’s these high growth stocks that are most sensitive to rate change. As the debate over inflation raged, the so-called FAANG stocks – Facebook, Amazon, Apple, Netflix and Google - fell nearly 17 per cent from mid to late February and remain volatile.v

That doesn’t mean all shares are vulnerable. Instead, market analysts expect a shift to ‘value’ stocks. These include traditional industrial companies and banks which were sold off during the pandemic but stand to gain from economic recovery.

Property market resilient

Against expectations, the Australian residential property market has also performed strongly despite the pandemic, fuelled by low interest rates.

National housing values rose 4 per cent in the year to February, while total returns including rental yields rose 7.6 per cent. But averages hide a patchy performance, with Darwin leading the pack (up 13.8 per cent) and Melbourne dragging up the rear (down 1.3 per cent).vi

There are concerns that ultra-low interest rates risk fuelling a house price bubble and worsening housing affordability. In answer to these fears, Governor Lowe said he was prepared to tighten lending standards quickly if the market gets out of hand.

Only time will tell who wins the tussle between those who think inflation is a threat and those who think it’s under control. As always, patient investors with a well-diversified portfolio are best placed to weather any short-term market fluctuations.

If you would like to discuss your overall investment strategy, give us a call.

i Trading economics, viewed 11 March 2021, https://tradingeconomics.com/united-states/government-bond-yield

ii Trading economics, viewed 11 March 2021, https://tradingeconomics.com/australia/government-bond-yield

iii https://www.reuters.com/article/us-oecd-economy-idUSKBN2B112G

iv https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/growth-prospects-for-australia-and-world-upgraded-by-oecd-20210309-p57973.html

v https://rba.gov.au/speeches/2021/sp-gov-2021-03-10.html

vi https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/2020/12/31/stock-market-record-2020/

vii https://www.corelogic.com.au/sites/default/files/2021-03/210301_CoreLogic_HVI.pdf

This article is intended as an information source only and to provide general information only. The comments, examples, words and extracts from legislation and other sources in this publication do not constitute legal advice, financial or tax advice and should not be relied upon as such. All readers should seek advice from a professional adviser regarding the application of any of the comments in this article to their particular situation.


What’s to do when interest payments on your cash are worth so little?

What’s to do when interest payments on your cash are worth so little?

Cuts in interest rates are welcomed by homebuyers and other borrowers. But for retirees and others who depend on interest payments for their income, falling interest rates can be disastrous.

For them, a drop in interest rates from 3% to 1% meant a massive 67% drop in income. And with rates falling again from 1% to 0.5% they’ve suffered a further 50% reduction in income.

And sadly, that’s not the end of the story. There’s inflation to consider too!

Right now, the headline inflation rate, as measured by the Australian Consumer Price Index, is running at approximately 1.3%. That means, the real value of your money, i.e., the purchasing power of your cash, has fallen by 1.3% over the last 12 months.

With interest rates sitting at around 0.4%-0.5%, the interest you can accrue from your cash is not enough to cover for that 1.3% loss from inflation.

So, the harsh reality right now is, if your money is sitting in cash it’s actually costing you to keep it there!

If you’re not a retiree the story gets even worse, because there’s tax on interest to consider too!

What Are The Alternatives?

The big challenge for a retiree when looking for alternatives is acquiring cashflow that carries acceptable risk.

Aside from the term deposits favoured by many retirees, annuities are worth considering. An annuity effectively exchanges an up-front lump sum for regular income payments. They are generally considered to be low risk. However, as an interest-producing investment, returns are low when interest rates are down.

High dividend yielding shares have also been a traditional source of income for retirees, offering not just income but also the prospect of capital growth. However, shares can also fall in value, and the economic uncertainty precipitated by COVID-19 saw many companies cut or cancel their dividends as their profits fell.

Hybrids offer attractive middle ground between regular shares and bonds

Hybrids such as convertible shares, preference shares and capital notes have elements of debt and equity (share) investments. Their prices are usually more stable than ordinary shares, and they pay either a fixed or floating rate of interest, often as a fully-franked dividend, above a particular benchmark, usually the Bank Bill Swap Rate.

Lately at House of Wealth, we’ve been helping a lot of retiree clients take advantage of Convertible Notes issued by some of the major Australian banks. These offer security of your principal along with the potential to participate in share price gains.

For retirees preferring a less hands-on approach to managing their portfolios as well as diversification away from individual securities, a vast range of managed funds are available that suit all risk tolerance levels, and can provide regular income over and above the insulting rates of interest currently on offer.

Portfolio Balancing Can Help You Go the Extra Distance

With interest rates at unprecedented lows, many retirees will have no choice but to dip into their capital to meet their cash flow needs. If the portfolio contains a reasonable allocation to growth assets and depending on market conditions, then capital growth may be sufficient to cover cash withdrawals.

A long-term perspective

In abnormal economic times it’s important to keep some perspective. Economic upheavals are often short term. Retirement, on the other hand, can last for decades.

To ensure your retirement portfolio is optimised to weather the current interest drought, contact us today.

And if you’ve not already done so over the last 12 months, feel free to book in for a free financial health check, where we can discuss your options.

This article is intended as an information source only and to provide general information only. The comments, examples, words and extracts from legislation and other sources in this publication do not constitute legal advice, financial or tax advice and should not be relied upon as such. All readers should seek advice from a professional adviser regarding the application of any of the comments in this article to their particular situation.


Economy and Market Update Feb 2021

Economy and Markets Overview: February 2021

Economy and Market Update Feb 2021

Economy and Markets Overview: February 2021

It’s February, the kids are back at school and the nation is getting back to business. It’s still not business as usual, but with the vaccine rollout about to begin there is a growing sense of optimism.

International Markets

There was a sense of relief on the global economic front in January as Joe Biden was sworn in as US President.

Financial markets rallied on expectations of more US government financial stimulus and a stronger focus on containing the COVID-19 health crisis.

There were also positive economic signs from our other major trading partner, China where a V-shaped recovery is underway.

China’s economy grew by 2.3% in 2020, the best performance of any major economy even though it was China’s slowest growth since 1976.

Australian Markets

Here in Australia, there were also signs of a cautious economic recovery. Consumer confidence hit a 14-month high in January, due to our success in dealing with the pandemic and supporting jobs.

The ANZ-Roy Morgan consumer confidence rating hit 111.2 points, just below its long-term average of 112.6.

Unemployment fell from 6.8% to 6.6% in December, a time when businesses typically hire casual staff for the Christmas-summer holiday rush.

Retail trade fell 4.2% in December but was still up 9.4% over the year. Inflation remains weak, with the consumer price index (CPI) up 0.9% in the December quarter and also up 0.9% in 2020 overall.

The exception is house prices, up 3% in 2020. This was reflected in the value of new home loans which rose 5.6% in November due to record low interest rates and government policy initiatives. The Aussie dollar finished the month slightly lower at US76¢.


Would I be better off with an SMSF?

Would I be better off with an SMSF?

Self Managed Super Funds (SMSFs for short) can save you a ton of money — or cost too much — depending on your circumstances. Part of their attraction is the extra flexibility they offer in investing your super - e.g. in real estate.

This quick and easy guide explains exactly who they're best suited for. If you've ever wondered, it will help you decide whether it might be worth your while exploring the possibilities of Self Managing your own Super.

As well as control, investment choice is a key reason for having an SMSF. As an example, these are the only type of super fund that allow you to invest in direct property, including your small business premises.

Other reasons people give are dissatisfaction with their existing fund, more flexibility to manage tax and greater flexibility in estate planning.

What type of person has an SMSF?

If you think SMSFs are only for wealthy older folk, think again.

The average age of people establishing an SMSF is currently between 35 and 44. They’re also dedicated. The majority of SMSF trustees say they spend 1 to 5 hours a month monitoring their fund.i,ii

But an SMSF is not for everyone. There has been ongoing debate about how much you need in your fund to make it cost-effective and whether the returns are competitive with mainstream super funds.

So is an SMSF right for you? Here are some things to consider.

The cost of control

Running an SMSF comes with the responsibility to comply with superannuation regulations, which costs time and money.

There are set-up costs and ongoing administration and investment costs. These vary enormously depending on whether you do a lot of the administration and investment yourself or outsource to professionals.

A recent survey by Rice Warner of more than 100,000 SMSFs found that annual compliance costs ranged from $1,189 to $2,738. These are underlying costs that can’t be avoided, such as the annual ASIC fee, ATO supervisory levy, audit fee, financial statement and tax return.iii

If trustees decide they don’t want any involvement in the administration of their fund, the cost of full administration ranges from $1,514 to $3,359.

There is an even wider range of ongoing investment fees, depending on the type of investments you hold. Fees tend to be highest for funds with investment property because of the higher management, accounting and auditing costs.

By comparison, the same report estimated annual fees for industry funds range from $445 to $6,861 for one member and $505 to $7,055 for two members. Fees for retail funds were similar. Fees for SMSFs are the same whether the fund has one or two members.

Size matters

As a general principle, the higher your SMSF account balance, the more cost-effective it is to run.

According to the Rice Warner survey:

• Funds with $200,000 or more in assets are cost-competitive with both industry and retail super funds, even if they fully outsource their administration.

• Funds with a balance of $100,000 to $200,000 may be competitive if they use one of the cheaper service providers or do some of the administration themselves.

• Funds with $500,000 or more are generally the cheapest alternative.
Returns also tend to be better for funds with more than $500,000 in assets.

Even though SMSFs with a balance of under $100,000 are more expensive than industry or retail funds, they may be appropriate if you expect your balance to grow to a competitive size fairly soon.

Increased responsibility

While SMSFs offer more control, that doesn’t mean you can do as you like. Every member of your fund has legal responsibility for ensuring it complies with all the relevant rules and regulations, even if you outsource some functions.

SMSFs are regulated by the ATO which monitors the sector with an eagle eye and hands out penalties for rule breakers. And there are lots of rules.

The most important rule is the sole purpose test, which dictates that you must run your fund with the sole purpose of providing retirement benefits for members. Fund assets must be kept separate from your personal assets and you can’t just dip into your retirement savings early when you’re short of cash.

Don’t overlook insurance

If you considering rolling the balance of an existing super fund into an SMSF, it could mean losing your life insurance cover. To ensure you are not left with inadequate insurance you may need to arrange new policies.

If you would like to discuss your superannuation options and whether an SMSF may be suitable for you, don’t hesitate to call.

i https://www.smsfassociation.com/media-release/survey-sheds-new-insights-on-why-individuals-set-up-smsfs?at_context=50383

ii https://www.smsfassociation.com/media-release/survey-sheds-new-insights-on-why-individuals-set-up-smsfs?at_context=50383

iii https://www.ricewarner.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/Cost-of-Operating-SMSFs-2020_23.11.20.pdf

This article is intended as an information source only and to provide general information only. The comments, examples, words and extracts from legislation and other sources in this publication do not constitute legal advice, financial or tax advice and should not be relied upon as such. All readers should seek advice from a professional adviser regarding the application of any of the comments in this article to their particular situation.